Tag Archives: clergy

We Want to Wish You a Merry Chrismukkah

I came downstairs the other morning to find our Hanukkiah sitting on the living room floor, beside Carl’s work backpack.

How sweet, I thought. He’s getting our Hanukkah decorations out to make sure my holiday doesn’t get dwarfed by Christmas. This has been our routine for a few years. I go crazy making sure all his grandmother’s hand-tatted angels find their way onto our Christmas tree branches. He counts the Hanukkah candles leftover from last year, then orders enough from Amazon to last us through the whole eight nights.

Turns out, I was half right.

Carl retrieved our Hanukkiah for our use, but also to light during the Christmas Eve service at the Unitarian congregation where he serves as minister. For the first time since 1978, the first night of Hanukkah intersects with Christmas Eve.

Most families might not notice this cosmic coincidence, determined by a lunar cycle that means Gregorian dates for Jewish holidays shift yearly. In our family, we can’t help but notice. Carl grew up celebrating Christmas. I celebrated Hanukkah. When we married at my family’s synagogue more than nine years ago, we chose Judaism as the dominant religion in our home.

As if the Judeo-Christian complexity of our December holidays weren’t enough, there’s also the minister issue. This is arguably the busiest time of Carl’s professional year, although he might disagree. All I know is that on Dec. 24, he’s officiating at a wedding, followed by two Christmas Eve services.

He’ll be back at his pulpit by 10 a.m. on Christmas Day, a time when most normal people are unwrapping presents or eating breakfast casseroles. This means we will not eat Christmas Eve dinner together, nor will we have time to unwrap presents on Christmas morning, as we have done for the entire twelve years we’ve been a couple.

On Christmas Day, we’re hosting a lunch for his mother, my sister, her husband, and their three kids, all of whom keep kosher. I will be cooking for hours beginning Friday night. As I peel two pounds of grapes for Carl’s grandmother’s fruit salad recipe, I will no doubt be channeling my Bubbie Fran: Eat. Eat. Eat. This is appropriate because Jews will outnumber Christians by 3 to 1 at our holiday table.

I would be lying if I wrote that I felt at peace this holiday season. The darkest time of year is hard on us. But I’m trying not to get swept up in the holiday crazy, to become aware when I feel consumerism’s pull. Sometimes I get it right. The other day, when a man honked at me near Walgreens, I flipped him a peace sign.

Still, I truly lost it earlier this week when a large package arrived for Carl. He’d ordered himself the exact same monastery made meditation cushion I’d purchased for his Christmas gift. This means it’s Dec. 22, his mother’s flight arrives tonight, and I still don’t know what I’m getting the man who wants nothing for Christmas. (Lump of coal? Lump of coal?)

Still, it’s amazing to me that I even have money to purchase holiday gifts. I grew up in a family where money was scarce, and sometimes I didn’t know if I would receive presents on Hanukkah. They were always small gifts, always something I needed. It goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: I wish I’d cherished everything my mother ever gave me.

Now my mother-in-law lavishes me with gifts, which she wraps in Hanukkah paper. She spoils me beyond words, and I appreciate her consciousness at a time when it’s 100 percent more likely that the receipt checker at Costco will wish me a “Merry Christmas” instead of “Happy Hanukkah” or miracle-of-miracles Chanukah sameach.

My mother-in-law still lives in the small South Carolina community where she took her son to a big steeple Baptist church a few times a week. Where she finds Hanukkah wrapping paper, I will never know. I do know that I’ll be making her and Carl blueberry blintzes for breakfast on Christmas Day, before they scurry off to church. (Thanks, Bubbie Fran.)

I also know we create refuge by sharing in each other’s traditions, rather than foisting traditions on each other.  I still do not know how to live without shouldering other people’s expectations. But that’s what New Year’s resolutions are for.