Category Archives: miscarriage

A Genealogy of Loss

1. My grandmother’s first child was born in August 1942. He died in January 1943. The word baby appears at the top his tombstone. The age 4 ½ months appears on the bottom.

2. He died in the same hospital where he was born. He died in the hospital where my mother was born eleven years later.

3. He died in the hospital where my sister gave birth to her first child. A boy, born in August.

4. All of my grandmother’s granddaughters have given birth except for me. Their first children have been boys.

5. Eleven months after she lost her son, my grandmother gave birth to a girl. She named her daughter for her lost son. Beverly. Bernard.

6. Beverly and Bernard had blonde hair, blue-green eyes. Seven letters in each of their names.

7. Family systems psychologists believe patterns repeat in families. Behaviors duplicate. Addictions multiply. We choose our partners based on our parents, our siblings, our grandparents. We echo their patterns, or repeat them, or break them. Lately, I have been wondering about those patterns. I have been wondering if we inherit misfortune, the way we inherit eye color, hair color, left handedness.

8. How else to explain the patterns of misfortune that cycle through families, a genealogy of loss? Or specifically, how else to explain the patterns of misfortune that cycle through my family, all the sad coincidences?

9. Some researchers believe anxiety travels in our genes. Others says it doesn’t. Who can really know?

10. In college, when I was overwhelmed, my mother told me to make lists.

11. She said, “Once it’s down on paper, you can make sense of anything.”

12. So here’s what I know:

13. When Bernard started to cry, my grandmother called the doctor. She told him her son kept pulling on his ear. She did not believe the doctor’s over-the-phone diagnosis of an ear infection. The doctor did not listen to her persistent pleas. I am afraid the doctor perceived her as a complainer. I am afraid he was a man who did not perceive a woman as credible.

14. When I was pregnant, I started writing about Bernard.

15. I do not know why. Maybe I was afraid I was going to miscarry. Maybe I already knew I would. (Intuition runs in the family.) Maybe I wanted to understand my grandmother in a new way –– mother-to-mother.

16. When I was pregnant, I requested Bernard’s death certificate.

17. A few days later, I started to bleed.

18. My husband tells me correlation does not necessitate causation. He is an ENTJ on the Myers Briggs. I am an INFJ, the most intuitive personality type.

19. A midwife examined me on a Friday afternoon. She told me I’d have to wait until Monday to receive my lab test results. She would not tell me I was having a miscarriage because she did not want to “be wrong and look stupid.”

20. Her doubt fed mine.

21. Even after I peed on a pregnancy test stick and received a negative result, I doubted the intuition that ripped through me.

22. When Monday came, I called to complain about the midwife. I asked for a written apology. My family tragedy was not about her self-perception or lack of confidence or whatever she had going on in her head that day.

23. I am still waiting. I have, however, received a bill for the trans vaginal ultrasound she performed, a procedure that women identify as traumatic. I had two trans vaginal ultrasounds in one week.

24. Bernard died on January 4, 1943. A Monday.

25. Beverly’s first and only son was born in January 1966. He was 46 when he died. His mother was 69.

26. I was out of town when Bernard’s death certificate arrived, but my husband e-mailed me a photo.

27. The cause of death is adrenal hemorrhage caused by bacterial meningitis. No ear infection recorded.

28. The family buried Bernard on June 5, 1943. They had to wait because the ground was frozen solid that winter. Jewish custom is to bury the dead within 24 to 48 hours.

29. All winter and spring, Bernard’s body lay in a freezer, in a morgue.

30. By his funeral, my grandmother was already pregnant with Beverly. I imagine her standing at the grave, full-bellied and overfull of grief. How did she stand there? How did she not slide into the same darkness that held her son?

31. Five years later, she delivered a second son on June 6. Her son lived past infancy. He has survived two sisters and one brother, a mother, a father, a nephew.

32. In Hebrew School, our teachers said ancient rabbis did not consider a child to be a child until it cried. They said a child was not a child until the eighth day, when circumcision was performed, or a name was given. At 13, I thought this sounded like a clever rule. Now, not so much.

33. Jewish mystics believe the number 36 is a symbol for life multiplied. Double chai, it’s called. I conceived at 36. I miscarried at 36.

34. My grandmother lost a child in 1943.

35. I lost someone who has no name in 2017. I lost hope, possibility, my last shreds of faith.

36. But I am making a list. I am trying to make sense of it all.

Bubbie with Bernard

 

 

Grief Songs

When my mother was dying, I listened to Patsy Cline. “Crazy.” I Fall to Pieces.” Sweet Dreams.” Her songs set the soundtrack to my grief. I listened to them when I wrote in a D.C. apartment I shared with two Scripps Howard interns.  At the time, my mother was not yet dead. So my grief was anticipatory. But we didn’t have that concept back then. Anticipatory grief.  I had no language to orient me. I kept silent.

Patsy’s songs vocalized what I could not say. She sang of lost loves and unrequited loves and vanished dreams. She sang of desire and brokenness. She sang of memory’s cohering power.

Patsy didn’t write her songs. But she made them her own. When she sang them, she sounded like she was on the verge of weeping. The word I’d use now to describe her sound is mournful. Her voice ached, and that ache mirrored the pain pulsing in my own heart, a pain I could barely acknowledge as true.

I’ve always found it difficult to listen to music when I am grieving. So many songs and artists have felt like an affront to my sorrow, or like betrayal. But Patsy’s music feels like an affirmation, like I have permission to be happy and sad in the same breath. She relieves my guilt. She assures me I am not alone. She reminds me we all have something to mourn.

I now live a few blocks from an apartment where Patsy lived with her first husband, the one from whom she acquired the Cline name. I have walked the same streets she walked. I have seen the same architecture, the same trees.

I find it strange to think of myself sharing a literal path with her, even if her music has accompanied me on the path I’ve walked alone for fifteen years, a path that started when my mother began to die.

We often think of death as an event, and sometimes it is. A terrible accident or crime. But death can also be a process that takes years or days or months to culminate. In my mother’s case, we had three months from when her kidneys began to fail until she died. Three months where neither of us said the word dying. If we spoke it aloud, we would make it true. Also, the word dying felt false.

Because even as she experienced deadly organ failure, my mother was alive. She was living in the same ways she’d lived most of her adult life, although restricted by dialysis and insulin dependence.

She woke up each morning and made her Dunkin Donuts coffee. She watched “Good Morning America” and read The Baltimore Sun. She clipped Susan Reimer columns for me. She called her mother. She called me.

She listened to me complain about the roommates who didn’t like me for reasons neither of us could discern. She supported me in my refusal to date an extremely nice boy. How could I develop a relationship with someone else when she occupied so much of my attention? What was the point of loving someone new as I stood on the edge of losing the one person I loved more than anyone? I never voiced these questions to her. They languished in the silence between us.

When I visited her, we watched “The Golden Girls,” and she cooked for me. She baked me cookies from a Pillsbury roll. She made vegetable soup from a box mix, then sent me home with a Tupperware container full of dinners for the week. She took care of me, even as I began taking care of her.

In the midst of all this normalcy, it was easy to pretend things were normal, to pretend appearances could equate with experience.

In suburbia, where I was raised, normalcy is an aspiration. So is being okay. In the worst moments of her life, my mother clung hard to these myths of normalcy and okayness. And I affirmed them by staying silent.

I knew how to perform normalcy. I did not yet know how to mourn.

***

I visited Patsy Cline’s house in Winchester, Virginia recently. This was the first trip I took after losing a pregnancy that came after two years of waiting for my body to be able to sustain conception. I am not exaggerating when I say I wanted this baby as much as I have wanted to resurrect my mother. I am surprised by how much I want, how wanting compresses me, constricts me.

Mourning, too, is a kind of wanting.

I am mourning what I’d thought of as a baby growing inside of me, even though doctors used different words. Embryo. Fetus.

I am mourning the baby I wanted, and who did not come to be.

I am mourning the baby I want and might not ever have.

***

I find myself listening to Patsy’s songs each morning before I start my day. She sings me into my sadness, the way she did when my mother began to die.

So many people ask me, “How are you?” Or they send me texts like, “Are you feeling better?”

And I feel pressured to give the answers I suspect others want for their own relief. Fine. Yes.

But Patsy lets me be.

It is hard to tell the truth when we are grieving. And this makes me feel more alone, the pressure to perform normalcy.

The truth is I am sadder than I’ve been in a long time. The truth is grief has no finish line. The truth is grief is the shadow side of love.

Grief is what we inherit as a consequence of our love. It is proof of how powerfully we have loved.

This is why so many love songs are really about loss. This is why Patsy always sounds like she’s about to weep. She understands grief and love as separate sides of the same brilliant coin.

I listen to her at night now too, the same way I did years ago when I could not yet acknowledge my grief.

Now I let her sing me to sleep. I let her remind me of how terrible and beautiful our sorrow can be.

Patsy (2).jpg