Category Archives: bodies

Why I’ve Left My Last Male Doctor

On Sunday night, an itchy, painful rash appeared on my back. I took off my shirt, faced a mirror, took a photo of the rash and texted it to my friend Anne, my husband, my sister. We all need someone we can text photos of our rashes to in the middle of the night, right? I am grateful for my people.

The next morning, the itching turned into a tingling, burning pain. I drove to urgent care and lifted my shirt once more while a doctor examined me in a box-sized room.

“Definitely shingles,” he said. And I started to cry because I’m not used to men believing me when I tell them something is wrong. I am not used to medical professionals taking my health seriously. I live in the body of a woman. I am used to being gaslighted. I am used to being dismissed, disbelieved. I am used to being objectified and shamed.

At each doctor’s visit since my miscarriage, I am reminded of the midwife who told me she wouldn’t confirm my miscarriage because she didn’t want to be wrong and “look stupid.” I am reminded of how another person’s ego can matter more than my body.

I saw my GP the day after my diagnosis. I asked him to clarify when I could return to my exercise routine. He avoided my question and spoke at length about how my shingles ridden body is a danger to pregnant women in the first trimester. He did not tell me to quarantine myself, as the chance that a pregnant woman would catch chickenpox from me is profoundly rare and involves skin-to-skin contact. I’m not in a sexual relationship with a pregnant woman. Nor do I have plans to walk around topless in order to infect a topless pregnant woman with chickenpox. My life is not an episode of “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.”

So why would this doctor speak such absurd words to me, if not to remind me that my body is less valuable than a fertile, pregnant body?

But I doubt my doctor was conscious of the message underlying his words. My experience is that men are frequently unconscious of gender bias or gender inequality. Claiming ignorance allows them to claim power, to claim women’s bodies. Patriarchy looks like this, and like this, and like this, and like this.

My experience of my GP is that he enjoys being the smartest person in the room, and his answers matter far more than my questions. I should have left him two years ago, when he minimized an abnormal TSH test. But I was sick, and I needed help. I did not have the energy to find a new doctor. I was willing to put up with this doctor in order to get the medical treatment I needed at the time. Women learn to put up with a lot of bullshit in order to get what we need, and I am no exception.

I wish I could be more assertive. I wish I were not conditioned into silence, obedience, people pleasing.

At my urging, my GP recommended two endocrinologists –– one female. He cautioned me that she had “a strong personality.” I am now a patient in this female endocrinologist’s practice. She is among a small number of “outside” physicians that Johns Hopkins surgeons trust to interpret thyroid ultrasounds. Hopkins values her medical opinion, whereas my GP’s language insinuated those opinions as threatening.

We live in a society where “strong personality” is code for opinionated, is code for bitch.

I am okay with being opinionated. I am not okay with being perceived as a bitch because this perception makes me easier to dismiss as unstable.

In the past year, I’ve lived more fully into a life with an autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis). I’ve learned that I need to dismiss doctors who dismiss me. I’ve learned to trust that sinking feeling in my gut when a doctor talks over me or says something absurd.

This has largely meant leaving male doctors in favor of female doctors.

I didn’t stand up and leave my GP’s office the moment he failed to answer my question. I did make a follow up appointment with another physician the next day. I chose a female physician recommended by a friend who lives with autoimmunity and chronic pain. She has taught me to reach out and build a network of female patients and practitioners who can support me.

My experience has been that female physicians listen to my concerns and prioritize my health more often than male physicians. Recent research published by JAMA Internal Medicine supports my experience, although I have certainly been dismissed by female medical professionals. Yet these experiences are far less common.

Years ago, I read a magazine article that said female diabetics are fifty percent more likely to die than men. While I no longer have the article, more recent research supports this idea in regard to type-1 diabetics who have renal disease, as my mother did. I long wondered why she fared so poorly in health systems as a juvenile diabetic, especially because she was a registered nurse. Why did she die while wearing an insulin pump? Did gender bias hasten her death?

After her organ transplant in 1994, my mother became a patient advocate. She created brochures for patients that I edited. She wrote letters-to-the-editor. She helped change healthcare laws in Maryland, and I went with her to the Maryland State House when she testified for the General Assembly.

We never talked about gender bias in the medical profession, or how the gender bias of a society threatens female bodies in countless invisible and insidious ways. That cultural conversation simply wasn’t happening when she was alive.

But I like to think we are living at a moment when a shift has begun, when  voices are rising up to shatter silence. I like to think her legacy propels me to speak out and make change for myself and others.

She showed me what an advocate could look like – in her case, an advocate became a woman in a hospital bed, a woman in a wheelchair, a woman tethered to dialysis machines. She taught me all bodies deserved respect. My body deserved respect.

I wish I’d believed her the first time.

 

 

Shame Me Never

Once a man stopped my mother and me as we walked from a grocery store to her parking spot.  “What’s your disability?” He asked, pointing to the handicap accessible parking permit hanging from her minivan’s rearview. I don’t remember what my mother said back to him, but it was probably something like “Mind your business.” We both knew he was calling her a liar in an indirect way. His question was an attempt to shame her. This is how people who lack a sense of power exert control. They make a weapon out of shame.

She was 39 when the handicapped permit arrived in our lives, just three years older than I am now. She had no visible wrinkles, no grey hair. She never left the house without bright pink lipstick and Jackie-O sunglasses. She wore red nail polish on her toes. She did not look like a woman who was dying, at least if you think a dying person cannot be young or able bodied or capable of running an errand with her daughter.

But she was dying. Just a year before the parking lot encounter, my mother nearly died from a diabetic insulin reaction in front of me. She would have died had my sister and I not rubbed cake icing on her gums and dialed 9-1-1. We kept her alive while the paramedics made their eternally long drive to our house. We were nine at the time. This was not the first time we saved her life, but that’s another story.

***

When my mother was sick, when she was dying, I never used those words. Sick. Dying. This is not because I was afraid or in denial. It is because I was ashamed. Shame tunneled to the core of my being. Shame policed my language. Shame erased my self esteem. If I ignored shame, I thought I could make it go away. Instead of confronting my shame, I hid in my bedroom and read books about the Holocaust. I read every book about the Holocaust that our tiny library owned. I craved stories of other people’s suffering. I needed to know I was not alone. I needed to know suffering could happen to anyone.

Indiscriminate suffering became the theme of my writing. I wrote stories about girls whose mothers died or disappeared. I wrote these stories until a middle school teacher pulled me into the hallway one day and asked me if I was a masochist. She did not give me time to answer before she told me to stop writing these stories. They were freaking her out. I didn’t stop. I just stopped showing this teacher what I wrote.

Years later one of these stories won a national award that helped me get scholarships for college. My sister saved the story for me. She has always believed in my writing. A few months ago, she found the story and called me to tell me my life’s work is to write novels. But I can’t write fiction anymore. I don’t know why, or what happened to me, only that my inability to write fiction is directly connected to my mother’s death. I wrote one short story the year after she died. It was about a girl who tried to kill herself but survived.

I was the suicidal girl.

I was the girl who did not die.

***

No matter what my mother ate or how many times she tested her blood sugar, she would have an insulin reaction. She could not control her disease. Her disease would not be controlled.

She felt at fault for this dynamic, and she was made to feel this way inside a culture whose dominant narrative of illness employs words like “battle” and “fight” to erase the reality that control is usually the first thing to go when a person is sick. My mother did not battle her disease. She lived it for 35 years. She endured organ damage, organ loss, organ rejection, surgeries, hospitalizations, fractured bones, daily needle injections and blood draws, depression, and anxiety.

When she went to sleep at night, she never knew if she’d wake up in the morning. She wore an insulin pump. It did not save her.

The night after she died, I slept in the bed where she’d taken her last breaths. Her insulin pump beeped in the middle of the night. I threw it across the room. I wanted to break it open. After it hit a wall, the pump fell onto the carpet, completely intact.

­­My mother didn’t get to live in a time when women spoke openly about how shame silenced and policed us. The expression “body shame” was not part of her lexicon. She bought into the myth that her disease could be cured, and she believed her organ transplant was a cure. When her organs rejected seven years after the surgery, she gave up hope. She accepted her death. I do not know if she felt anger or if she blamed herself. During the last month of her life, she was the saddest I had ever seen her. She was sad to the core of her being.

Only a few close friends knew about my mother’s transplant or her organ rejection. Shame kept me silent. Shame kept me from reaching out. Shame kept me isolated. Shame fed my own depression.

***

I’ve had to speak up about my own illness this week. I’ve had to tell a friend and mentor –– and leader on my campus –– that I need to take breaks in order to protect my body from immune system attack. This need may mean that I miss out on opportunities. This need means I am not “leaning in.” This need means that I have to say the word “can’t” even though I’ve been taught never to say this word.

I am an overachiever. I am good at what I do. I am ashamed of myself when I say the word “can’t.”

I feel lazy. I feel like a quitter. I feel like a person who wants to squeak by doing the minimum. I am none of these things, but that’s the power of the word “can’t.” It evokes suspicion and disdain, especially when women use this word to set boundaries. You see, when a woman sets a boundary, there is often a professional cost. We are either shamed by others for setting the boundary, or we shame ourselves.

I’ve decided to stop giving a shit about shame. I’ve decided to take away shame’s power to control me. “Can’t” is not a bad word. Sometimes it’s the word I need to say, the only one that can save me.

Conditions of Power

 She died a famous woman denying

her wounds

denying

her wounds came from the same source as her power – Adrienne Rich

 

A few years ago, I posted this selfie on Twitter.

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I was annoyed by a Vidal Sassoon ad campaign that connected “styled” hair to a good selfie. My tweet went something like this: @vidalsassoon behind every good #selfie is a woman who refuses to connect selfhood to her hair.

I took the photo after I’d finished 35 uphill minutes on an elliptical machine. My hair is unbrushed, unwashed, and full of sweat. I’m not wearing any makeup.

At the time, I thought my selfie was funny and a little bit brave. It meant I could be real. It meant I could present my face the same way men do every day –– without augmentation. It meant I didn’t care if people thought I was ugly. But the truth is there’s a part of me that still cringes each time I look at this photo. There’s a part of me that feels messy and ashamed of my mess. There’s a part of me who fears being ridiculed for my bare face, or for publically presenting an unadulterated version of who I am.

My mother wore makeup until the day she died. Even without makeup, she was a truly beautiful woman. But she tied her self worth to how others perceived her beauty, and she taught me to perceive myself the same way.

When I break these rules, I feel like I’m violating a fundamental code of womanhood. I feel like a failure because of all the beauty standards I inherited from my family and culture, and also because I lost my mother just a few weeks after I turned 21. She died at the moment my life as an adult woman began.

I had no one to shop with on the eve of my college graduation, no one to call to talk “outfits” with before my first job interview, no one to ask if my hair was too short or my lipstick was too dark or too bright.

I had to figure it all out on my own.

––––––––

This week, I facilitated a dialogue on my campus. A week before the event, my friends started asking me what I was going to wear. They offered to give outfit consults or to lend me professional clothes. But I hate suits, even pantsuits. I hate the word “blazer.” I feel like a fraud in clothing that’s designed to hide my female body. I prefer dresses, especially dresses with wild and colorful patterns.

In the end, I decided to wear a safe black dress Carl picked out for me and a jade necklace I bought during our last trip to New Orleans. I wanted to focus on the substance of the dialogue. I did not want to think about my clothes or how I appeared to others. I wanted to feel comfortable.

But an hour before the dialogue, I started getting nervous. Was my lipstick too bright? Was my dress too casual? Too low cut?

I found two female colleagues and asked them my questions. They relieved me of my doubt. One gave me a hug. Another let me use her office mirror to fix my hair, then she ran a lint roller down the back of my cardigan, which was covered in dog hair.

Even though my mother has been dead for almost 15 years, I still crave her approval. I still look for her in other women. One day, I hope I will look to myself first.

––––––––

My thinking about female selfhood and beauty is motivated by the amount of time I spend at the gym –– in mixed gender exercise classes where women are encouraged to become powerful in our bodies, and where we literally exercise our power.

For me, these spaces are one place where women are affirmed in resisting narrow beauty standards. At the gym, we sweat. We have bare faces and messy hair. We run. We climb. We lift. We bike. We get strong.

My mother was once strong, too. After her transplant, she began jogging on a treadmill her cousin bought her. She competed in two U.S. Transplant Olympic Games held in Columbus, Ohio and Salt Lake City, Utah.

These competitions were a way to publically reclaim power over her body in the wake of chronic illness. But in the last months of her life, she lost that power. She suffered stress fractures in her feet after walking barefoot on a beach. She needed a wheelchair to run errands.

Other mothers expressed panic when they saw my mother confined to a wheelchair. (Their daughters shared this panic with me.) My mother’s aging and diseased body could just as well be their own. I do not fault them for these fears. I often harbor the same ones.

Like my mother, I exercise to reclaim power over my body, and this is why I felt compelled to tweet my workout selfie to Vidal Sassoon, and why I still need to be in-your-face about my post-workout face.

When I exercise, I condition my body and break down my female conditioning. I become more fully myself, more fully alive. I become a woman who is a little less self conscious, a little less approval seeking, a little less afraid, a little less worried about her clothes, her makeup, her hair.

 

Not Everyone Will Like You

First grade was hard for me. We moved to a new neighborhood, and I started first grade at a new school.

I’d finished Kindergarten at a Jewish nursery school in Baltimore, and I read way above grade level. I also read on the bus, at the bus stop, and under my desk in class. When other kids played outside, I stayed inside to read.

Another girl started teasing me. She called me a bookworm and told other kids to do it too. Bookworm! Bookworm! They yelled. I cried about the whole thing to my mother.

Here’s what she told me:

“Not everyone will like you. There’s nothing you can do about it.”

She said these words simply, with no explanation. She did not tell me that these children were wrong not to like me. She did not tell me I was wrong for wanting to be liked. She simply spoke the truth as she understood it.

Not everyone will like you.

Of all the things my mother ever told me, these words are among the most important. She freed me to be myself. She freed me to not waste time winning over people who were never going to like me. She freed me from good girl conditioning that leads to the toxic trifecta of people pleasing, repression, and resentment.

Still, I didn’t learn the lesson immediately at 6. That day, I sat on her lap, while she ran her fingers through my hair. I breathed her Youth Dew. I sobbed into her dress with the floral collar.

I said, “Mommy, why won’t they like me?”

“They just won’t,” she replied.

I wanted everyone to like me. Sometimes I still do. But I also know that likeability is a trap for women. And I am coming to believe that my health depends on risking not being liked.

________

This has been a hard week for me. I had lab done work last Friday. My endocrinologist’s office left a vague voicemail message on Tuesday, asking if I could come in as soon as possible. (Don’t you love those messages?)

Short story: my TSH is increasing, even though my endo upped my dose of Levoxyl in December. My TSH has been increasing since I started Levoxyl in September. After six months, my TSH is still too high for me to safely sustain a pregnancy. My body is not responding to one of two medications I can take to treat this condition. My choices are limited because the widely prescribed meds contain ingredients like gluten and sugar that are not safe for me.

I turned 36 on February 16. My window of fertility is closing.

I received this news at work because that’s where I spend most of my time. I closed my office door. I texted some relatives and friends. A few wrote back. A few haven’t. It’s hard to hold other people’s bad news. It’s hard to face the truth that not everything works out in the end. Not every illness can be remedied.

Before class, a colleague asked me how I was doing. We were casually chatting in the bathroom. I told her the truth about the news I’d received. I said, “I know a lot of people say ‘fine’ when asked that question, but I’m not feeling ‘fine’ right now. I’m sad.”

I risked not being liked for being an oversharer. I risked her potentially saying, TMI and dismissing me. I risked her potential silence.

She said: “That’s what I love about you. You say what’s actually on your mind.”

I am so grateful to work with women who have the emotional capacity to be present to one another in times of distress. I am so grateful to work with women who do not hide who they are.

________

Last week I also spoke up about an ongoing issue at my gym.

Short story: I’ve fallen in love with Spin. (Spin is the best thing ever!), and I love my spin instructors. I am steadily increasing muscle mass while decreasing fat because they push me.

But something is happening to make me feel irritated, annoyed, and bitter in Spin. This something is this:

Class members are engaging in behaviors that gym policy doesn’t allow. They’re getting to class 15 to 20 minutes early, saving bikes with towels or other personal items, then leaving the room, sometimes entering late to mount a “claimed” bike. These behaviors appear entitled, even if that’s not their intention. These behaviors might not bother most people, but they bother me. I perceive them as unfair. I perceive them as degrading shared community space.

I needed to speak up about my feelings because repressing emotion negatively affects me. I’m also afraid it is affecting my thyroid health. This is not magical thinking. Countless studies support that stress adversely affects autoimmune conditions. My thyroid is located in my throat, the seat of my voice. I believe self-silencing damages me.

This morning, a person with the power to enforce gym policy told me that people would complain once the policy was enforced. They wouldn’t be happy. They might not like me. (Because I publically removed gym towels from a bike this morning, I will likely be known as the instigator of the policy’s enforcement.)

I said, I understand. I don’t care if people like me.          

 And I really meant it. I truly did not care. This doesn’t mean I’m not a compassionate or empathetic person. I care deeply about other people’s thoughts and feelings. But I can hold my own truths alongside those of others, even when our truths contradict. I know disagreement does not necessarily equate with delegitimization.

My mother’s words, spoken so long ago I barely remember them, came back to me this morning, as I left Spin. I thought of how her voice, which I can no longer remember, still instructs me, still shapes and forms me.

Not everyone will like you. There’s nothing you can do about it, I thought, as I walked to my car, buoyed by relief, feeling pressure in my chest dissolve. Feeling free.

Life Forward & Backward

My mother couldn’t ride a bike. She tried. I have one memory of her mounting a red road bike and pedaling around the block. For the rest of her life, the bike sat in our laundry room collecting dust.

I relate deeply to the scene in Steel Magnolias where M’Lynn, grieving her daughter’s death from juvenile diabetes, laments: “I’m fine! I can jog all the way to Texas and back, but my daughter can’t! She never could!”

I have always felt that scene in my whole body –– bones, blood, muscles, tears. Everything opening to M’Lynn’s words, unleashing a rock hard truth living at my core. My mother was sick. I was healthy. She died. I survived. I will not be sick.

For my whole adult life, I’ve been healthier than my mother, more alive than her, proof I’m promised a different fate. And I’ve had to prove this every single day. I’m not a marathoner or triathlete. That is too normal, too organized, too legit. My exercise habits have been secretive and ritualistic and irrational.

On some days, I have walked 40,000 steps, and felt like that wasn’t enough. I have run seven miles in 90-degree heat, then hiked the day away in the Blue Ridge Mountains and dehydrated myself. Right now, I have had the same bruise on my right toe for six years, and only recently realized it came from running in the wrong shoes.

I love the euphoria of a good run, but I’m not addicted to it. I’m addicted to proving I won’t die young like my mother. I will not be 48 and bound to a wheelchair. I can run or bike or swim or weight-lift or kayak. I can downward dog and stand on one foot for ten seconds. See? I’m fine.

Last summer, it became clear that I was not fine. I couldn’t get out of bed. I gained 16 pounds, despite not changing a single thing about my diet. The most exercise I could do amounted to numbingly slow walks in a park near my house. Then a rash appeared on my legs. It looked at first like small mosquito bites, then looked like pinprick clusters of dried blood when I looked closer. I’d never seen anything like it. The next day, I laid down on a doctor’s examination table.

It took six months, many blood tests, and an ultrasound to discover I had an autoimmune disease, not the disease that killed my mother, but an illness that, like hers, affects my endocrine system and binds me to her in a strange and familiar way.

My mother’s type-1 diabetes caused her immune system to destroy her pancreas. My Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is causing my immune system to destroy my thyroid, the seat of my energy and metabolism.

When I was diagnosed in December, I only told a few trusted people. I didn’t want to be different, sick, defined by an illness, have anything “wrong” with me. I didn’t want to be like my mother in this way, the worst way.

I tend to be an over sharer, but this is the first time I’ve blogged about Hashimoto’s, yet not the first time I’ve written about the disease. This September, Hippocampus Magazine will publish a micro essay about my diagnosis that I finished in February. The essay braids an experience of discovering my mother’s disease with the pivotal experience of discovering my own illness, which is undeniably linked to hers. Like all creative nonfiction, the essay is about more than the situation it describes. It’s about a larger story of how the past and future can flow into one another, how we can be there and here at the same time, and how we can long for a different life than the one we are living.

This week, while I was finishing another essay set in the years immediately following my mother’s death, a time that still feels excruciating to peer back into, my friend Lisa told me to keep writing. Then she sent me this quote from Soren Kierkegaard: “Life can be understood backwards; but it must be lived forward.”

How I loved receiving those words, the wisdom and hope that they carried, and the truth that unfolds through them. Still, when I look forward to my own future, I see more uncertainty than I’m comfortable facing. Sometimes I see nothing at all. Sometimes I see a flight of possibilities.

My diagnosis changes the story I tell about myself and shadows what I thought would be true for my life. When I look backward, I see my mother’s dignity and courage and strength; I see my own fear running parallel to her death for too many years. I see that  if we live long enough, we will all have experiences of our bodies becoming different and incapable of holding us the way they once did. I see a story I never expected, a story I don’t know.

I wrote that Kierkegaard quote on an index card and taped it to my desk, next to my mother’s laminated cremation certificate and a shrine of stones I keep beside it. In the morning, the stones catch the sun and glitter for a moment, reminding me the future can be uncertain and hopeful at the same time, defiant and sparkling with light.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Dead Mothers & Bathing Suits

For as long as I knew her, my mother had the same black bathing suit, a one piece that covered her cesarean scar. When she changed in front of me, I loved looking at that scar, a train track that ran down her navel. Her scar signaled her ultimate sacrifice, her body broken open in order to give me life. She never hid her body from me, but I inherited her shame, her scorn for her hips and thighs. I don’t know when this started, when I came to understand that mine and my mother’s bodies had failed in some deep and unknowable way, but I remember being nine and not wanting to put on my bathing suit for a swimming lesson. I remember wrapping myself in a towel and walking, head down, to the pool, hating my hips, wishing they’d disappear. I carried that shame into my adolescence and stopped swimming, even though a swimming pool is, to this day, the one place where I feel most boundless, and most like myself.

Years later, before her funeral, I uncovered a mirror and took a good, long look at my reflection. In that exhausting moment, I felt my shame dissolve. My body looked exactly like my mother’s. How could I not be comforted?

A week later, I left the house to swim. It was a big deal, one of the first times I re-entered the world without her, understood my life could continue beyond my most unfathomable loss. I wore a black bathing suit, a two-piece she would never have worn, and lost myself in the water. For that hour, as I kicked and pushed and breathed, I returned to myself, and to my mother. I felt the sharpest glimmer of hope arise within me. In the pool, in the water, I could stop time. I could shed my sadness, even if only briefly. I continued swimming that summer, and a year later I wore that same bathing suit on a beach bordering the African Sea, on the Isle of Crete. A person I’d just met snapped a photo of me standing, waist-high, in the pale, sun-dappled water. In the photo, I am squinting light out of my eyes and smiling. My head falls back in joy. I am thinking about dolphins and hiking and writing in a journal I’d given my mother to record her dreams; she’d never written a single word.

I wish I could say I batted shame away for the rest of my twenties, but that would be a big lie, or maybe a half-truth. I’m 35 now, and my body shows it –– grey hair, spider veins, a stomach that won’t quite ever be what it was nine years ago, when I wore bikinis on my honeymoon to Mexico. I still wince when I see my hips and thighs in a harshly-lit dressing room mirror. I still feel old hatred simmering. This week, as I prepared for a beach vacation, I spent more time worrying about bathing suits and my hips, than appreciating my good fortune, the fact that I’m going to the beach.

I resented my mother’s absence, the fact that this was just one more thing I’ve had to do without her for the past fourteen years. Often women tell me they can’t imagine doing the big things without their mothers: graduations, weddings, mothering their own children. But I think the small, everyday things are more brutal in their relentlessness. I’m incapable of shopping alone. Each time I try, I am reminded of how utterly, miserably bad I am at shopping without my mother. I need her in the mundane spaces of my life. And she’s not there. A particular grief stirs when I shop for bathing suits, a grief for the mother who is no longer with me, and a grief for the body I’m told I should have, but don’t. And then, there is the grief I feel for the body I once had, and is no longer mine.

I think bathing suit shopping is among the most complicated experiences a woman can have. By late May, the only options left seem to be bathing suits for a Kardashian or my Bubbie Fran. There’s rarely a middle ground in department stores, at least in my city. For comfort, I turn to Anne Lamott, whose book Traveling Mercies has sat on my shelf for almost as long as my mother’s been dead. Lamott describes the typically fruitless body-comparisons most women experience in dressing rooms, locker rooms, and on beaches. She details her own misgivings about her “dimply thighs,” but finds consolation in the “grace” of “comfortableness,” and writes: “And of the several things of which I’m most positive, one is that if I live to be an old woman, I won’t be sitting on my porch berating myself for having leapt into a swimsuit to swim in warm ocean water at every opportunity even though my thighs were dimply.”

Truly, I want to  leap out of my chair and shout “Amen” at the end of this sentence, but am afraid I will frighten my Unitarian husband and our skittish cats. So I will quietly whisper namaste, namaste, and start packing, knowing how happy my mother would be with the life I’ve created, and how if I called her right now to tell her I felt badly about my body, she would tell me I take after her. I am beautiful.

Purgatory

(According to random internet googling, I am the exact same height & weight as Beyoncé.)