Why I’ve Left My Last Male Doctor

On Sunday night, an itchy, painful rash appeared on my back. I took off my shirt, faced a mirror, took a photo of the rash and texted it to my friend Anne, my husband, my sister. We all need someone we can text photos of our rashes to in the middle of the night, right? I am grateful for my people.

The next morning, the itching turned into a tingling, burning pain. I drove to urgent care and lifted my shirt once more while a doctor examined me in a box-sized room.

“Definitely shingles,” he said. And I started to cry because I’m not used to men believing me when I tell them something is wrong. I am not used to medical professionals taking my health seriously. I live in the body of a woman. I am used to being gaslighted. I am used to being dismissed, disbelieved. I am used to being objectified and shamed.

At each doctor’s visit since my miscarriage, I am reminded of the midwife who told me she wouldn’t confirm my miscarriage because she didn’t want to be wrong and “look stupid.” I am reminded of how another person’s ego can matter more than my body.

I saw my GP the day after my diagnosis. I asked him to clarify when I could return to my exercise routine. He avoided my question and spoke at length about how my shingles ridden body is a danger to pregnant women in the first trimester. He did not tell me to quarantine myself, as the chance that a pregnant woman would catch chickenpox from me is profoundly rare and involves skin-to-skin contact. I’m not in a sexual relationship with a pregnant woman. Nor do I have plans to walk around topless in order to infect a topless pregnant woman with chickenpox. My life is not an episode of “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.”

So why would this doctor speak such absurd words to me, if not to remind me that my body is less valuable than a fertile, pregnant body?

But I doubt my doctor was conscious of the message underlying his words. My experience is that men are frequently unconscious of gender bias or gender inequality. Claiming ignorance allows them to claim power, to claim women’s bodies. Patriarchy looks like this, and like this, and like this, and like this.

My experience of my GP is that he enjoys being the smartest person in the room, and his answers matter far more than my questions. I should have left him two years ago, when he minimized an abnormal TSH test. But I was sick, and I needed help. I did not have the energy to find a new doctor. I was willing to put up with this doctor in order to get the medical treatment I needed at the time. Women learn to put up with a lot of bullshit in order to get what we need, and I am no exception.

I wish I could be more assertive. I wish I were not conditioned into silence, obedience, people pleasing.

At my urging, my GP recommended two endocrinologists –– one female. He cautioned me that she had “a strong personality.” I am now a patient in this female endocrinologist’s practice. She is among a small number of “outside” physicians that Johns Hopkins surgeons trust to interpret thyroid ultrasounds. Hopkins values her medical opinion, whereas my GP’s language insinuated those opinions as threatening.

We live in a society where “strong personality” is code for opinionated, is code for bitch.

I am okay with being opinionated. I am not okay with being perceived as a bitch because this perception makes me easier to dismiss as unstable.

In the past year, I’ve lived more fully into a life with an autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis). I’ve learned that I need to dismiss doctors who dismiss me. I’ve learned to trust that sinking feeling in my gut when a doctor talks over me or says something absurd.

This has largely meant leaving male doctors in favor of female doctors.

I didn’t stand up and leave my GP’s office the moment he failed to answer my question. I did make a follow up appointment with another physician the next day. I chose a female physician recommended by a friend who lives with autoimmunity and chronic pain. She has taught me to reach out and build a network of female patients and practitioners who can support me.

My experience has been that female physicians listen to my concerns and prioritize my health more often than male physicians. Recent research published by JAMA Internal Medicine supports my experience, although I have certainly been dismissed by female medical professionals. Yet these experiences are far less common.

Years ago, I read a magazine article that said female diabetics are fifty percent more likely to die than men. While I no longer have the article, more recent research supports this idea in regard to type-1 diabetics who have renal disease, as my mother did. I long wondered why she fared so poorly in health systems as a juvenile diabetic, especially because she was a registered nurse. Why did she die while wearing an insulin pump? Did gender bias hasten her death?

After her organ transplant in 1994, my mother became a patient advocate. She created brochures for patients that I edited. She wrote letters-to-the-editor. She helped change healthcare laws in Maryland, and I went with her to the Maryland State House when she testified for the General Assembly.

We never talked about gender bias in the medical profession, or how the gender bias of a society threatens female bodies in countless invisible and insidious ways. That cultural conversation simply wasn’t happening when she was alive.

But I like to think we are living at a moment when a shift has begun, when  voices are rising up to shatter silence. I like to think her legacy propels me to speak out and make change for myself and others.

She showed me what an advocate could look like – in her case, an advocate became a woman in a hospital bed, a woman in a wheelchair, a woman tethered to dialysis machines. She taught me all bodies deserved respect. My body deserved respect.

I wish I’d believed her the first time.

 

 

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